10.16.2009

Homeless American Girl Doll - Feedback Friday


Well, The Constant Complainer has uncovered another strange story that is perfect for this week's Feedback Friday.

The American Girl doll company is known for their concept of bringing history and dolls together. They develop dolls with a background, then sell the doll and history book together. Kind of an educational extension of the doll. I have boys, but it seems okay.

Well, the newest limited edition doll is named Gwen. Her accompanying story is that her daddy left her and her mother and they were forced to live in their car...(CBS News story, Parent Dish story).

The proceeds from the sale of Gwen do not go to aid the homeless. Gwen retails for $95.00.

Thoughts, comments?

.

28 comments :

  1. WHAT!?!?! I'm not 100% sold on the story being OK to tell kids but at least give something to benefit individuals who are experience this true situation. Wow.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow. Huh. That's ... interesting. I don't know why a parent would buy their daughter a "homeless" doll. Is that a picture of the doll? She doesn't look very homeless to me. I'd think a white dress would be very conducive to living in a box?

    ReplyDelete
  3. I agree with what shanna said! I wouldnt get that doll for my daughter and for them to sell the doll and not help the poor isnt very nice. I think half the profit should go twards the homeless!

    ReplyDelete
  4. What a strange idea! I mean, what is it all about, and what is it meant to represent? I agree with Shanna. Why would you buy a "homeless" doll?
    What is wrong with the traditional dolls? They are all homeless, until they become part of a Family and are loved by a special child!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Agree with the idea that half of the proceeds should go to the homeless.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Outrageous! Where do we write? I see no reason for this doll if it is not being done for a charitable reason. What homeless family could even afford an American Doll?? What about choosing and promoting something positive? A story about a struggling faimily who works hard-and then AD could give profits to Homeless...
    ~Nancy

    ReplyDelete
  7. I saw this on another blog, Clark Kent's Lunchbox, where he wrote a letter to the CEO. The doll story also has a dead beat dad. What a "great" representation of daddies, huh?

    Here's his link: http://clarkkentslunchbox.blogspot.com/2009/10/why-i-hate-mattel-toys-ceo-robert.html

    Also, you got tagged over at my blog for a creative meme - I hope you'll participate :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. This year's "Girl of the Year" is Chrissa. (Gwen's good friend.) This story is about Chrissa Maxwell - the new girl at school that gets bullied. It really is a very good movie & book. You can read more about it on my blog. (I wrote about it a month or so ago.) Back to the point, she be-friends Gwen and finds out that she lives in a shelter with her mom. She is homeless. But, the story is not about being homeless. But, to "Be courageous. Be a friend. Be yourself." Such an important virtue for little girls.

    ReplyDelete
  9. To do something like that and not have any proceeds go to help the cause they're highlighting - just a money making idea. Wouldn't buy it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Tactless comes to mind. I'm at a loss for any reason why this would be considered a good business move for American Girl and an even bigger loss on why a parent would buy such a tactless item for their child. Has anyone heard of paying it forward?

    ReplyDelete
  11. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  12. My daughter has the Bitty twins right now and has been wanting an American Girl doll which she will probably get in July for her birthday. Part of the excitement of getting a AM doll is picking one out. In the catelog, online, or in the store do you just tell your child that she can't have that one because you don't agree with what it stands for? While I'm not crazy about Gwen's story or what they are trying to accomplish with it I do think that in a way it sheds light on a huge issue. Molly, the depression era doll's family also loses a job and income and faces homelessness. Is it because her dad is still in the picture or the fact that they haven't been displaced to a shelter yet that no one saw issues with her back story? Gwen is a limited time offering that is part of a bigger story which was mentioned in the earlier comments. I still feel that American Girl dolls are a quality company and that the message they send young girls overall is one of empowerment and positive.

    ReplyDelete
  13. um...wow, I'm not sure how to feel. I'll have to think on that!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Like you...having a boy kind of makes me a little more tolerant of these things, Jen.

    That being said, I think the goal is more than commendable while the execution leaves little to be desired. Unfortunately, pulling the doll from the shelf to reevaluate the marketing, will lesson the amount of money actually donated to a rather needy cause.

    Why not purchase the doll for what it is, and feel good about the proceeds going to people that need it, while making sure that you buffer any written print with an explanation to your child?

    Just my 2 cents.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I guess my comments would be redundant given what you read on my post (thanks by the way). What's funny is the latest news: TIME Magazine named it the #1 most dubious toy on the market.

    http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1927306_1927313,00.html?artId=1927306_1927313_1927315?contType=article?chn=specials

    And one thing I didn't mention was that I'm behind the concept of the AG dolls - at least the original one. This one, however, seems to deviate from it. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  16. What's a monkeyball?! Over at the Nest comments we are all trying to figure it out! Ok, I'm gonna go back now and read your post. Hate me.

    ReplyDelete
  17. My comment for the post:

    I'm glad I have boys.

    Do boys have something to do with monkeyballs?

    tee hee.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Does everthing we have or do have to have a "teachable moment" attatched to it? This is just stupid.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Makes me feel dirty just thinking about it! I can maybe see the homeless doll if the proceeds were going to some organization that aids the homeless, but it's so demeaning. I hate it when companies cash in on fear and misfortune. Yuck.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I think that this is actually a good idea. It teaches girls to be accepting and helps them build empathy - something that our future generations need! As someone that works with homeless people, I think that many children could benefit from learning about this.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I can appreciate the fact that American Girl tries to make history relevant for little ones, but their products are all total rip-offs in my opinion. The dolls are nothing special other than the price tag. And the fact that they're making one of their dolls into a sob story and not even donating any of the proceeds is a joke.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I'm just glad I'm the mom of a little boy!

    ReplyDelete
  23. As far as parenting is concerned, I may as well be the Wicked Witch of the West. The girls begged and begged, when they were little, for an AGD. I feel the same about these overpriced dolls as I do about Disney. Don't care. Can't afford.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Are you kidding me?? They have always tried to capture a moment in time, and bring it alive for girls. How is living in a car historical?

    ReplyDelete
  25. Very odd. And, very disturbing.

    ReplyDelete
  26. As much as I love the AG series, I am quite appalled that none of the proceeds are going towards any charities.

    I think I am going to write a letter to the AG company and let them know how upset I am with them.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Wow, these were some great comments. And thanks for the mention, Jen. I thought this story was amazing and it set off a fury of comments on my blog as well. Two months ago, I had never even heard of this doll (or company). But some hosts on a morning TV show I watch here going nuts (in a bad way) over the idea of this particular doll. And I started to agree with them. I don't think understanding values is why they did this. They made this doll to stir controversy and sell more, which is clearly working. I truly believe if they had done it in part with a donation to a charity (under this umbrella), it would have gone over better.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Die Stunde von der Stunde ist nicht leichter. viagra generika bestellen cialis rezeptfrei [url=http//t7-isis.org]viagra generika[/url]

    ReplyDelete

Tell me what you think!

 

Template fueled by Blogger. Customized for Hope Studios by Brightfish Designs. ©2009
  • BrightfishDesigns at Hotmaildotcom